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Fishing for lost equipment?

The featured article in the February 2022 issue of Water Well Journal, entitled “The Preferred Fishing Tool”, delves into the age-old issue of what is the best method for retrieving lost tools and equipment that have fallen downhole. In this post, we will explore how a borehole camera system can prove to be an invaluable addition to your toolbox when planning your next fishing expedition.

Magnets or Junk Baskets – Which is best? The article begins with an assessment of which tool is superior for retrieval – magnets or a junk basket. Both methods have their place depending on what item needs to be recovered, but a common issue regardless of the method used is the inability to know precisely where the lost item is located within the well. In the early days of borehole inspection, impression blocks – blocks of a permeable material such as soap, wood, or wax – would be lowered into the borehole with hopes that the block would come in contact with the missing tool. The impression blocked would be hauled topside and the operators would attempt to decipher the impressions made on the block to help determine the topography of the borehole and the location of the lost tool.

I’d run my fishing tool down there, and if there is enough room, run my camera down in there and manipulate both at the same time. That made a world of difference. They paid for themselves time and time again. I love them.” – Marvin Magee, PE

Laval Underground Surveys established the borehole camera industry nearly 80 years ago. Today, we are incredibly proud to be the market leaders. Whether you’re considering purchasing a borehole camera system for tool retrieval, assessing the conditions within a well, or to use as a form of differentiation from your competition, we have an entire portfolio of borehole camera systems to suit your needs.



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